Georgia hunting regulations

Georgia Hunting Regulations

Georgia hunters enjoy great deer and turkey populations, upland game, small game, waterfowl, black bear and more. The state has a good mixture of public and private lands with opportunities for everyone. Having access to private through ownership or a lease is always a bonus. The general public can access over 104 WMA’s along with other state lands and federal lands.

Georgia Hunting License Costs

Residents:

  • Hunting – $15
  • Senior 65+ – $4
  • Annual hunt and fish – $30
  • Bear – $25
  • Deer – $25
  • Turkey – $25
  • Alligator – $75
  • Georgia Migratory Bird Stamp – $5
  • Trapping – $40

Non-residents:

  • Hunting – $100
  • 1 day hunt – $20 ($6 each additional day)
  • Annual hunt and fish $150
  • Bear – $225
  • Deer – $225
  • Turkey – $225
  • Alligator – $250
  • Georgia Migratory Bird Stamp – $5
  • Trapping – $325

Georgia Hunting Season Dates

Deer:

  • Archery, either sex statewide – September 9 – January 14
  • Extended Archery – Sept 9 – January 31
  • Primitive Weapons – October 14 – January 14
  • Firearms – October 21 – January 14

Northern Zone Bear:

  • Archery – Sept 9 – Jan 14
  • Primitive Weapons – October 14 – January 14
  • Firearms – October 21 – January 14

Central Zone Bear:

  • Firearms – Jan 13

Southern Zone Bear:

  • Firearms – Sept 21-23, Sept 28-30, Oct 5-7, Oct 12-14

Turkey:

  • March 24 – May 15, 3 per season

Alligator:

  • Aug 18 – Oct 2, limited by zone and quota

Crows:

  • Nov 4 – Feb 28, no limit

Dove:

  • Sept 2-17, Oct 14 – Nov 2, Nov 23 – Jan 15. 15 per day, 45 in possession

Fox and Bobcat:

  • December 1 – February 28, no limit

Grouse:

  • October 15 – November 29, 3 per day

Opossum:

  • October 15 – November 28, no limit

Quail:

  • November 18 – February 28, 12 per day

Rabbit:

  • November 18 – February 28, 12 per day

Raccoon:

  • October 15 – February 28, 3 per day

Snipe:

  • November 15 – February 28, 8 per day

Squirrel:

  • August 15 – February 28

Woodcock:

  • December 9 – January 22

Georgia has over 1.7 million acres of public lands. The Chattahoochie-Oconee National Forest makes up a significant portion of those lands. Wildlife Management areas are also important for hunter access and opportunity. You can view a complete list of the WMA’s here –┬áhttp://georgiawildlife.com/allwmas.

Another hunt that flies under the radar is wild hogs. There is no limit and no closed season on hog hunts. You may also swing access to private lands where hogs are a major nuisance. You can actually take 2 bears per season although only one may come from the southern or central zone. 3 turkeys means Georgia hunters can really get after gobblers. The limits on deer are also very liberal and filling a freezer with does is possible for archery and rifle hunters. Check your hunting zone for specific limits on deer and other species.

You can also find some great waterfowl hunting in the state. Check the Georgia hunting regulations for more specific information regarding the waterfowl seasons and limits.

 

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