Montana hunting regulations

Montana Hunting Regulations

Montana hunters enjoy great public access and a variety of game species. Big game is a huge draw for the state but there are also chances for upland bird hunting, waterfowl and small game. The amount of public lands opens the doors for exploration. The block management system allows allows hunters to access private lands. We have more about that program below.

Montana Hunting License Costs

Resident:

  • Hunting Base – $10
  • Archery – $10
  • Conservation – $8
  • Sportsman’s with Bear – $85
  • Sportsman’s Without Bear – $70
  • Antelope – $19
  • Bighorn Sheep – $125
  • Bison – $125
  • Black Bear – $19
  • Deer – $16
  • Deer B – $10-15
  • Elk – $20
  • Elk B – $20-25
  • Migratory Bird – $6.50
  • Moose – $125
  • Mountain Goat – $125
  • Mountain Lion – $19
  • Upland Game – $6.50
  • Turkey – $5
  • Wolf – $19

Non-resident:

  • Base hunting – $15
  • Archery – $10
  • Conservation – $10
  • Antelope – $205
  • Bighorn Sheep – $1250
  • Bison – $1250
  • Black bear – $350
  • Deer Combination (includes base, conservation, state lands, upland, fishing and general deer) – $625
  • Elk Combination (same as deer) – $885
  • Deer/Elk Combination (same as latter + general deer/elk) – $1041
  • Migratory Bird – $50
  • Moose – $1250
  • Mountain Goat – $1250
  • Mountain Lion – $320
  • Upland – $110
  • Turkey – $5 (upland required)
  • Wolf – $50

Montana elk hunting

Montana Hunting Application Deadlines

March 15 – Elk and deer deadline (2018)

June 1 – Antelope

May 1 – Bighorn, Moose, Mountain goat

June 28 – Super Tags

Point Systems – Montana uses a bonus point system. Every applicant has a chance at drawing. If you are unsuccessful, a bonus point is allocated. If you miss the application deadline, you can also buy a bonus point between July 1st and the end of September. Your bonus points are squared in the drawing. This means that someone with 3 points will actually have 9 entries in the lottery. The more you build, the better your odds of pulling the desired tag.

Montana Hunting Season Dates

Antelope:

  • 900 Series – Aug 15 – Nov 11
  • Archery – Sept 1 – Oct 5
  • General – Oct 6 – Nov 11

Bighorn Sheep:

  • Archery – Sept 1-14
  • General – Sept 15 – Nov 25

Bison:

  • Nov 15 – Feb 15

Black Bear:

  • Spring – April 15 – May 31/June 15
  • Archery – Sept 1-14
  • Fall – Sept 15 – Nov 25

Deer and Elk:

  • Archery – Sept 1 – Oct 14
  • Youth, deer – Oct 18-19
  • General – Oct 20 – Nov 25

Moose:

  • Sept 15 – Nov 25

Mountain Goat:

  • Sept 15 – Nov 25

Mountain Lion:

  • Archery – Sept 1 – Oct 14
  • Fall – Oct 20 – Nov 25
  • Winter – Dec 1 – April 14

Wolf:

  • Archery – Sept 1-14
  • General – Sept 15 – March 15
  • Trapping – Dec 15 – Feb 28

Upland Birds:

  • Mountain grouse – Sept 1 – Jan 1
  • Partridge – Sept 1 – Jan 1
  • Pheasant – Oct 6 – Jan 1
  • Sage Grouse – Sept 1-30
  • Sharp-tailed Grouse – Sept 1 – Jan 1
  • Spring Turkey – April 14 – May 20
  • Fall Turkey – Sept 1 – Jan 1

Montana’s Block Management Program

In addition to the extensive National Forest, BLM and State Lands, Montana offers access to private lands through the block management program. There are different types of block and some have special rules. You may be required to call ahead on a specific day and time and access is limited to the first couple of callers. In other instances, you simply sign in at a box and can hunt the property. Many properties are limited by species as well. Some are waterfowl only while others allow for big game, upland, waterfowl, etc. While this requires a bit of research, it opens up a ton of productive ground and it spreads out the hunting pressure. Be respectful and follow the rules so we can continue enjoying the block program. You can view maps and info here –┬áhttp://fwp.mt.gov/hunting/hunterAccess/blockman/. It changes each year as well so make sure you check the most current listings.

Hunting Highlights in Montana

Start browsing the Montana hunting regulations and it doesn’t take long to realize the incredible opportunities. Elk are distributed throughout the state and occupy ecosystems ranging from high elevation to open grasslands. World class mule deer live in several units and whitetails are a sleeper species, rivaling many midwestern and southern states. The 900 series antelope opens mid-August when few other hunts are happening. Upland birds occupy a good chunk of the state and there are some seriously productive waterfowl grounds. Throw in dense predator populations and you can’t really go wrong hunting here.

Return to Hunting Regulations State Listings.